Yesterday's Rundown | That road when you're struggling towards Peace


Yesterday's Rundown


-----{1}-----

Today, I find a peaceful rhythm after writing a letter conveying some of my transparent thoughts to my boss.  Hopefully the Christmas break will give us perspective.  I've written three drafts and the peace settled on the 3rd so I know that it's time to finalize it and send it.  

Tomorrow, I'm heading to my hometown for Christmas break.  Unfortunately, it might feel a little different this year since Mom has still not been discharged from the hospital.  But I'm looking forward to the change in scenery and smelling the island air again.  

Last night, I was able to find some peace in the music of Yimura.  My favorite so far has been Kiss the Rain and even mustered a poem because of it.  





all i can do is cry
to the endless crooning
of a piano hummed song
the afternoon’s weight
washed away like leaves
on a tear-filled river
and the waiting is of no end

the wine glass fills
yet again
the red stains in drops
and i wonder how sublime
can be its taste when mixed
with tears

the chorus of the keys
fills up the void that 
reverberates inside my chest
and it sing about that place
i am looking for
but cannot find 


-----{2}-----

I am enjoying the words of Jonathan Safran Foer's "Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close".  The voice of Oskar is endearing and catches me wondering with his questions that randomly pierce the thoughts with such sharp honesty.  




She asked me what was wrong.  I told her, "The same thing that's always wrong." "You're sick?" "I'm sad." "About Dad?" "About everything."  She sat down on the bed next to me, even though I knew she was in a hurry:  "What's everything?" I started counting on my fingers: "The meat and dairy products in our refrigerator, fistfights, car accidents, Larry--" "Who's Larry?" "The homless guy infront of the Museum of National History who always says 'I promise it's for food' after he asks me for money."



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